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Advice for Roses and Garden Plants

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  1. Frequently Asked Questions

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Below we have tried to answer some of the most common questions we get asked, but more in-depth information can be found within our advice pages. WHAT IS A BARE ROOT ROSE? Bare root roses are supplied without any soil, hard pruned and often have no foliage, during the winter months when the plants are dormant. This means that they are no longer focussing their energy into new growth and can therefore be lifted from the ground without causing any stress to the plant. This is normal for roses at this time of year and they will quickly produce healthy new growth come spring. The benefits of buying bare root roses are that there is a greater choice of variety available, as well as being planted at a less stressful time for the plants. This means that they can develop a strong healthy root system quicker than a containerised rose planted in the middle of summer. WHAT IS A CONTAINER ROSE? Our container roses are potted with specially prepared compost during

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  2. Rose Gardening Calendar

    Rose Gardening Calendar

    A simple month by month guide which can be used as a handy reference tool throughout the year to ensure that your roses will always look their best. JANUARY By the end of the month you should aim to have completed your annual staggered pruning of established Climbers and Ramblers that flower on current seasons wood (Group One). For a guide on how to prune these roses please click here.January is also a good time to plan your summer garden, so ensure you have the most up-to-date catalogues to help inspire you. FEBRUARY Pruning, pruning and more pruning! All established bush and repeat flowering shrubs should receive their annual prune this month. As a general rule bush roses should be reduced down to approximately 5 to 7 buds from the base of the plant and shrub roses should be thinned out, reducing younger stems by a third and older stems cut

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  3. Rose Families Explained

    Rose Families Explained

    There are many different rose families, each with its own characteristics from clusters of small flowers to large shapely blooms and a variety of scents which vary in strength. Below we give a brief description of the many rose families we have available within our extensive rose collection. ALBAS A very old race of roses. The Albas flower in early summer, are almost invariably scented and extremely resistant to disease. Foliage is grey-green and produced abundantly on an upright, vigorous plant which never outgrows its welcome in any garden.   Shop Albas ARVENSIS RAMBLERS Rosa arvensis, ‘The Field Rose’ can be found growing wild in the countryside. Its hybrids have inherited the same vigour of the

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  4. Download How to Guides

    Download How to Guides

    To download/print our how to guides please click on the links below   How to Plant and Prune Roses Guide   

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  5. How to Videos

    How to Videos

    How to plant bare root roses In this short video Ian Limmer, Nursery Manager at Peter Beales Roses offers easy step-by-step advice on how to correctly plant bare root roses.   How to plant container roses This video will guide you through the basics of planting roses bought in pots so that they can establish quickly into your garden and you can enjoy beautiful blooms for many years to come. Don't forget that the most important thing when planting roses during the summer is regular watering!  

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  6. Inspiration

    Inspiration

    Roses have many uses and can be used in a variety of different ways to add interest and excitement to your garden. Within this section we look at a few creative ideas which may hopefully inspire you to take rose growing to a new level. MAKE YOUR OWN ROSE HIP TEA Did you know that you can actually make your own rose hip tea?The process is actually very easy and fun to try, plus it’s a great source of vitamin C!During the Second World War, at a time when oranges and other foods high in vitamin C were hard to acquire, schoolchildren were actually given rose hip syrup to keep them healthy. This was something that Peter Beales used to remember vividly telling stories about how he used to collect rose hips from the hedgerows as a boy. To make tea for two you will need 7 large ripe rose hips with the stems removed. Hips from the Rugosa family are the best for this. Just make sure you get your rose hips from a

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  7. Clematis Care Guide

    Clematis Care Guide

    After Purchase Keep compost moist.Harden off any soft growth occurring in early spring.   Planting Make sure the rootball is thoroughly moist before planting.Keep approximately 12”(30cm) away from walls and fences; 2-3ft (60 – 90cm) from shrubs or trees.Dig a hole large enough for the rootball and manure, and deep enough to cover stem bases.Add well-rotted manure or garden compost plus a good handfull of bonemeal into the hole. Mix well with the soil at the base of the hole. If dry, fill the hole with water and allow to drain. MIX ALL RAW  INGREDIENTS WITH SOIL.Loosen roots if necessary and plant in hole so lowest leaf joint(s) will be buried.Backfill hole and gently firm taking care not to damage stem bases. Carefully remove ties and cane and tie stems to support.Water well, then regularly, as necessary throughout the growing season, particularly during periods of dry weather.Clematis benefit from a mulch of

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  8. Pruning Shrubs, Perennials and Climbing Plants

    Pruning Shrubs, Perennials and Climbing Plants

    Pruning Shrubs & Climbers When first faced with the task of pruning Shrubs and Climbers it can seem like quite a daunting and confusing task, but once you start to understand the growing characteristics of the different Shrubs you have growing within your gardens, it should become easier over time to understand how each one needs to be pruned and the reasons why. Some might simply need a light prune to remove spent flowers if necessary or to shape the plant, whereas others may need regular hard pruning to encourage new vigorous growth to keep the plant healthy. The timing for pruning also varies and depends on flowering time, variety and placement. To make it easier to gain an understanding of what Shrubs and Climbers require pruning and also when and how they should be pruned, they are divided into 13 different pruning groups. These 13 pruning groups are detailed below:   Group One

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  9. Bare Root or Container Roses

    Bare Root or Container Roses

    Choosing your roses – bare root or container Traditionally roses were supplied bare root during the winter months whilst in their dormant state. However, over recent years there has been an increasing demand for roses to be supplied in containers during the summer. Once the plants are established there will actually be very little difference between them, but there are a few advantages and disadvantages to both methods and the decision simply comes down to personal preference or availability.   The Potted/Container Rose Container roses are available to purchase from us throughout the year, but please note there is likely to be less choice towards the end of the year. This is because our roses are containerised early in the year, so come winter there will naturally be fewer containers and less choice available. The big advantage of buying a containerised rose, is that i

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  10. Feeding and Watering Roses

    Feeding and Watering Roses

    Feeding Roses Roses are very hungry plants and should therefore be fed regularly throughout their lives to ensure maximum blooms and growth, from first year plants through to 50 year old ramblers. We recommend a good feed of a nitrogen high feed like “Top Rose Gold” after the late-winter prune in February, then feeding every two weeks throughout the flowering period with a high potash feed like “Tomorite” or "Uncle Tom's Rose Tonic". This photo shows just ho

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The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe investing in rural areas

Plant Centre Development The Rosarium restaurant and new plant house at our Garden Centre in Attleborough, Norfolk were part funded by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and officially opened May 2019