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Advice for Roses and Garden Plants

11 to 15 of 15 Results

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  1. Pruning and Dead-Heading Roses

    Pruning and Dead-Heading Roses

    Pruning your Roses Pruning worries many gardeners but if you keep the rules simple it is quite a logical procedure. In all pruning, dead and diseased wood should always be removed. If taking away an entire branch, try to leave as little of it behind as possible to avoid dead stumpy areas on the plant. All other cuts should be made above an outward-facing bud and on an angle away from it, thus preventing rain-water from sitting there. Remove wood, which has rubbed against other branches, and become damaged. Try to keep the centre of the plant open. Always use good quality, sharp secateurs to ensure that cuts are clean. Both the Expert Bypass Pruner and the Professional Pruner by

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  2. Training Roses

    Training Roses

    Training climbing and rambling roses Roses do not cling to the wall themselves like some plants do. Therefore they will require tying in. On a wall it is a good idea to put up trellis or wires for this purpose. As the rose grows it should be encouraged to grow horizontally outward and upward. The lower stems straight out where possible and the taller ones, up and then outward. In this way new growth will be encouraged, as will more flowers. On a pillar it is best, where possible to train the branches around it for the same reason as above. Ramblers for trees will need to be tied to the trunk to begin with until the branches meet those of the tree, thereafter, the tree will act as a natural support.

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  3. Pests and Diseases

    Pests and Diseases

    Pests and diseases that affect roses As with all plants, roses can become infested with pests or damaged by disease. This should not however be a reason for not including them in the garden, as Peter used to say ‘what are a few black spots among friends?’Good husbandry is really a matter of common sense, a little bit of logical thinking in relation to the choice of variety and it’s situation, its care coupled with preventative measures will go a long way in maintaining a healthy rose.   Pests Pests can include a range of creatures that often feed off of the plant and can, if left untreated, cause serious damage to your roses. These can include Aphids, Caterpillars, Leaf Rolling Sawfly, Rose Slug Sawfly, Red Spider Mite and Thrips. Whilst traditional methods of control such as spraying with insecticides are often effective in controlling an outbreak of these pests,

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  4. Daffodils

    How to Plant Bulbs

    As the summer draws to a close, many gardener's start to look ahead to spring and the joy of the first flowers of the season starting to emerge. Spring bulbs are an essential part of any garden and have an amazing ability to lift people’s moods after the cold, wet and often uninspiring challenges of winter. To enjoy a truly spectacular display each year it is worth considering a few important things before planting. Preparation Fork the soil over well and mix in a slow-release fertiliser such as bone meal or fish blood and bone when planting bulbs. Especially on heavy soils, dig in horticultural grit and sand to prevent waterlogging, this can cause bulbs to rot.  

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  5. Ian Pruning with shears

    A worry free guide to pruning roses

    Whether you are completely new to roses or have been growing them for years, pruning them can seem like a bit of a daunting task, but it needn’t be. The first thing I would really like to stress is that no matter how bad a job you make of pruning your roses, you are not going to kill them! As the old gardener’s saying ‘Get your worst enemy to prune your roses’ suggests, roses are tough and can take a lot more abuse than people give them credit for. Just think about how badly butchered hedgerows look along the roadside after the farmer has hacked them back. It’s easy to look at them, resembling nothing more than bare broken and splintered sticks and wonder how these poor roses and hawthorns will ever survive, but they do. A trial was conducted several years ago at the Gardens of the Rose, St Albans, where some of their roses

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The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development: Europe investing in rural areas

Plant Centre Development The Rosarium restaurant and new plant house at our Garden Centre in Attleborough, Norfolk were part funded by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development and officially opened May 2019