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Diamond Jubilee (Bush Rose)

  • Repeat Flowering

(H.T) A lovely rose of buff apricot. Fragrant. Healthy free flowering, good for cutting, exhibition and bedding.

Diamond Jubilee (Bare Root Rose)

£13.50 each or 3+ for £12.15 each

Available to order (delivery from early November to early April)
CODE: BDJUB Sold on behalf of: Peter Beales Roses Ltd

Diamond Jubilee (Container Rose)

£20.50 each or 4+ for £18.50 each

Out of stock (delivery normally all year round)
CODE: CDJUB Sold on behalf of: Peter Beales Roses Ltd

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Preferred location

Flowering times


More Information
Height & Width Range 3' x 2' (90cm. x 60cm. )
Rose FamilyHybrid Teas
Date of Introduction1947
Rose ColourYellow
Bloom SizeLarge
Bloom TypeDouble
Suitable for...
  • Growing in pots
  • Warm climate
Flowering PeriodRepeat Flowering

Roses were first sold in pots, as were most plants, to fulfil the demands of the instant gardener, but the traditional method of supply is as bare root plants in the winter months, often by mail order. There is little between them as far as the ultimate plant is concerned, but there are advantages and disadvantages to both.

Container roses

Containerised roses are available throughout the year (although there are more available in the summer months for various reasons) and are roses that we have planted into containers during the winter months, when the plants are dormant. If purchasing a container rose early in the year, it is advisable to wait until after June before planting out into the garden. This is to give the roots of newly potted roses a chance to establish. In summer months containerised roses must be watered daily to ensure good health and maximum blooms. The advantage of buying a rose in a pot is that you can select the plant yourself during a visit to our nursery and gardens, giving you the opportunity to see the rose in flower prior to purchasing. Containerised roses are available for delivery within 7-10 days.

Bare root roses

Throughout the winter months, from November to March, the roses are dormant and can be cut back and safely handled in bare root form. Many established rose gardeners call this the peak time for purchasing and planting roses, as a rose planted in February has many months to put down a great root structure to support the blooms and the plant for the years to come. Most roses planted in February will put out a great display of blooms the same year. Bare root roses are obviously live plants so do need fairly immediate treatment upon arrival. This can be difficult in times of heavy frost or snow. It is prudent in these conditions to prepare an area in which to heel in the roses (more advice on heeling in can be found within our planting advice pages). We would never advise buying a pre-packed rose from a supermarket for you have no idea how long they have been packaged and may well have dried out. Bare root roses are available to order throughout the year and are normally delivered between November 1st and March 31st, during the bare root season.

Pruning newly planted bare root roses

These should always be hard pruned at the time of planting, before they are placed in the hole is the logical time. Even the most rampant of ramblers will benefit from this treatment as it encourages basal growth, from which the plant will make its shape. Climbers, ramblers and shrub roses should be reduced to about six inches, bush roses to about four inches.

How to plant bare root roses

For a bare root rose the hole should be wide enough to allow the roots to be spread out and deep enough so that the base of the stems are just covered. The same depth applies for a potted rose, and although the hole should be wide enough for the root ball, I would not advocate the teasing out of the roots, the plant should be young enough to allow the roots to break through. If required, the addition of proprietary rose food or bone meal, into the base of the hole, should be done now. A handful is enough and this should be mixed in with the soil there to avoid root scorch. A little powdered food can also be sprinkled onto the removed soil before it is returned.

The hole should be wide enough to accommodate the spread out roots, it is at this stage that rose food or bone meal can be added.

The bare root rose should now be held with one hand at the right depth with the roots spread out, whilst the first of the soil is returned, either by hand or with a spade. When approximately half the hole is full the rose can be left alone and the soil firmed in by foot. The remainder of the soil can then be returned and firmed in the same way.

Once this is done the surface soil may be tidied and the rose labelled, there is nothing more annoying than not knowing the name of a beautiful rose.

Shrub roses should be planted at the closest 60cm (2ft) apart.

How to plant a rose bought in a container

The same depth applies for a rose bought in a container, with the first inch or so of the branches below soil level, and the hole wide enough for the root ball, there is no need to tease the roots out but better to leave the root ball intact. If purchased early in the summer season (before June) it is wise to leave the rose in its pot to give the roots time to establish.

Please Note: Bare-root roses are tied in bundles. If you have ordered more than one rose please cut the string holding the roses together and separate carefully before planting.

Bare root roses should not be planted when their roots are dry nor should they be planted during frost. If it is frosty when you receive them, they should not take any harm left unopened in their package for up to one week. If it remains frosty for longer than this open the package and, after moistening the roots, place the roses still in their bundle in a container of damp soil or damp sand. A wooden box, bucket or large polythene bag will usually hold enough soil for this purpose. Plant out the roses when the frost has disappeared. If the roses arrive when it is not convenient for you to plant them, they should be 'heeled in' out of doors the moment the weather permits.